About ToxicTrailers.com

ToxicTrailers.com was launched after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 when the government spent more than $2 billion on FEMA trailers with high levels of formaldehyde that sickened thousands of people. The FEMA trailer tragedy exposed what is a widespread problem in RVs, mobile homes, modular buildings and even conventional buildings that use pressed wood products. Unfortunately, as we approach the tenth anniversary of Katrina, formaldehyde regulations are not being enforced in the U.S., and people's health is at risk. If you are having burning eyes, congestion, sore throat, coughing, breathing difficulties, frequent sinus infections or rashes, and difficulties concentrating, you may have a formaldehyde problem. For questions or to share your story, write 4becky@cox.net.

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Formaldehyde laced showers in W. Va.

This will sound familiar to the people who lived in FEMA trailers. In West Va. where hundreds of thousands of people are being exposed to formaldehyde vapors while showering because of a chemical spill in the drinking water, the government says the water is safe for everyone except pregnant women. LA Times reports: "I can guarantee you that citizens in this valley are, at least in some instances, breathing formaldehyde,’’ Scott Simonton, a Marshall University environmental scientist and member of a state water quality board, told a legislative committee in Charleston on Wednesday. "It’s frightening, it’s really frightening," Simonton told the panel. He said he and his family are not drinking or cooking with the water, even though state and federal authorities have declared it safe for all uses. ...Formaldehyde is listed by the Environmental Protection Agency as a likely human carcinogen that has caused cancer in animals. The EPA says the colorless, pungent gas can cause burning sensations in the eyes and throat, nausea and breathing difficulties in exposure to elevated levels, defined as above 0.1 parts per million. It can also trigger several allergic reactions. ..."The problem is, we’re seeing it in water,’’ Simonton said in remarks first reported by the Charleston Gazette. "We don’t know what the concentration is in the air.’’ According to Simonton, methanol in the chemical that spilled into the water supply, 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol, or MCHM, can break down into formaldehyde. "This stuff is breaking down into formaldehyde in the shower or in the water system, and they’re inhaling it,’’ Simonton said of some of the 300,000 residents of nine West Virginia counties told not to use their tap water in the days after the spill. http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-west-va-chemical-spill-20140129,0,4877251.story#ixzz2ruhoyQHE