About ToxicTrailers.com

ToxicTrailers.com was launched after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 when the government spent more than $2 billion on FEMA trailers with high levels of formaldehyde that sickened thousands of people. The FEMA trailer tragedy exposed what is a widespread problem in RVs, mobile homes, modular buildings and even conventional buildings that use pressed wood products. Unfortunately, as we approach the tenth anniversary of Katrina, formaldehyde regulations are not being enforced in the U.S., and people's health is at risk. If you are having burning eyes, congestion, sore throat, coughing, breathing difficulties, frequent sinus infections or rashes, and difficulties concentrating, you may have a formaldehyde problem. For questions or to share your story, write 4becky@cox.net.

Monday, July 23, 2007

who's really to blame?

Thanks for all the updates on this issue. However why isn't OSHA and these trailer manufacturers being held accountable and responsible for allowing these products/trailers to be sold to the public? Are they in bed together? That's the real issue here, not FEMA. Obviously these trailers are being sold throught the country by every manufacturer in the US to the general public. Why doesn't someone put the spotlight and point the finger at OSHA and the manufacturers to improve their standards regarding chemical levels, materials used etc,?

Who's really in charge or overseas the building codes and standards that are allowed by manufacturers to sell a certain product to consumers that is safe without health hazards? We cannot allow this agencies and manufactures to get away with these deadly practices any longer. There will be millions of people retiring in the near future who will be purchasing trailers, motor homes, 5th wheels etc, that will be exposing all kinds of toxic chemicals to not only older people put their grandchildren as well. Please let me know who these agencies are and again keep up the fight and great work that you are doing to keep us informed on these issues.

Sincerely,

Bob